Fashion collection 2012
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MBT makes fantastic, high-quality footwear that is designed to take a beating and last. These are shoes designed for walking and constant, daily use. Most fans of the brand hail their durability and high-quality manufacturer’s guarantee. Of course, at more than $200 a pair, they should be.

wear fashion mbt shoes can help?

see mbt benefits here:

MBT makes fantastic, high-quality footwear that is designed to take a beating and last. These are shoes designed for walking and constant, daily use. Most fans of the brand hail their durability and high-quality manufacturer’s guarantee. Of course, at more than $200 a pair, they should be.

I’ve been playing with a service called Convotrack that allows you to easily track mentions of a story on Twitter, Digg, Reddit, blogs, etc.

It pulls up a sidebar that lists the tweets and Diggs about a particular story.

eg: http://convotrack.com/1OB shows you the mentions on a story I…

sreetips:

I tell my students their tweets should be helpful, useful, friendly,  humble, generous… To help them understand what I mean, I collect  examples of tweets that match that criteria, though showing them the  opposite of such tweets (scroll down here) is sometimes more effective.
When I saw a tweet that said “Feeling very happy about my awesome  company” I knew I’d have to add it to my collection of disappointing  tweets. But I was even more disappointed to see who it was from: @Ev,  Evan Williams, a Twitter co-founder.
I have been generally very  impressed by the tone of all of Twitter-the-company activities on line.  They’ve a lot to be proud of and have avoided being arrogant and  show-offish, including the founders, Williams; @Biz, Biz Stone; and @Jack, Jack Dorsey. So this  particular tweet seems out of character. It could be tongue-in-cheek or  somehow ironic, but I don’t think so. Especially when you consider his  previous tweet was: “The food is amazing — as is the company — at the Twoliday Party. Well done, team” and his next tweet was: “Listening to Ira Glass tell stories, live. Sounds different when you can see him.”
[I presume the Twitter folks won’t even notice this post, but if I disappear off Twitter, you’ll know why <grin>.]
Post your comments below.

sreetips:

I tell my students their tweets should be helpful, useful, friendly, humble, generous… To help them understand what I mean, I collect examples of tweets that match that criteria, though showing them the opposite of such tweets (scroll down here) is sometimes more effective.

When I saw a tweet that said “Feeling very happy about my awesome company” I knew I’d have to add it to my collection of disappointing tweets. But I was even more disappointed to see who it was from: @Ev, Evan Williams, a Twitter co-founder.

I have been generally very impressed by the tone of all of Twitter-the-company activities on line. They’ve a lot to be proud of and have avoided being arrogant and show-offish, including the founders, Williams; @Biz, Biz Stone; and @Jack, Jack Dorsey. So this particular tweet seems out of character. It could be tongue-in-cheek or somehow ironic, but I don’t think so. Especially when you consider his previous tweet was: “The food is amazing — as is the company — at the Twoliday Party. Well done, team” and his next tweet was: “Listening to Ira Glass tell stories, live. Sounds different when you can see him.”

[I presume the Twitter folks won’t even notice this post, but if I disappear off Twitter, you’ll know why <grin>.]

Post your comments below.

JOB: Multimedia news professor job opening at Northeastern University

sreetips:

Take a look folks - looks like a great opportunity. I understand the search has been extended, so get your applications in now - or tell your friends.

Northeastern University
Assistant Professor
School of Journalism - College of Arts & Sciences

Boston Main Campus

Northeastern University’s School of Journalism seeks an outstanding professional or scholar for a tenure-track position as an assistant professor with a specialty in multimedia news.  He or she will be able to give undergraduate and graduate students the practical skills and the theoretical grounding to be able to produce sophisticated journalism on the World Wide Web and other platforms. In addition, the successful candidate will have demonstrated through a substantial body of work a distinctive perspective on journalism’s future in the digital age and an ability to translate those insights into important and original theoretical or applied research.  He or she will play a unique role in shaping the curriculum of a long established and successful journalism program to better fit the demands of the changing news market. The successful candidate will have the chance to work with undergraduate and graduate students who take journalism seriously and who have had substantial professional training through Northeastern’s co-operative education program. Northeastern’s location in the center of Boston means the successful candidate will be part of a vibrant media and academic community.

Read More

good:

More specifically, Business Insider asks whether Tumblr blogs help sell subscriptions. The answer here at GOOD is that we kinda don’t care. #realtalk

Just kidding! Of course we want people to subscribe to our quarterly print magazine. But pushing subscriptions is not the primary motivation for our Tumblr. Or even the secondary motivation. Or tertiary! You get the idea.

Maybe it’s because we’re still in the honeymoon phase with this thing (a very successful honeymoon—we’ve got nearly 5,000 followers after less than two months!), but we’re basically just excited about Tumblr as a new way to connect with people who are into what we do. Especially because Tumblr tends to be such an image-driven space, and we love telling stories and organizing information in visual ways. We also like giving readers a glimpse behind-the-scenes at GOOD: our office pets, stupid board games we’re playing, what we’re eating.

Do we want our Tumblr followers to click through to Good.is and check out the rest of our awesome content? Yeah. Do we want you to subscribe, too? Absolutely! But we don’t overthink it. Tumblr is just fun. Thanks for hanging out with us here.

—Ann Friedman, Executive Editor

good:

In 1944, a cartographer named Harold Fisk traced the mighty Mississippi River, as it flowed in his day, with a thin, snaking line of white. He pored over geological maps and added a series of earth-toned ribbons showing where he thought the river had flowed in previous decades.
Map via NPR’s Krulwich Wonders as adapted from Harold Fiske’s 1944 Geological Investigation of the Alluvial Valley of the Lower Mississippi River
Click through to see the whole amazing map.
What the Flooding Mississippi Means for America’s Dinner - Food - GOOD

good:

In 1944, a cartographer named Harold Fisk traced the mighty Mississippi River, as it flowed in his day, with a thin, snaking line of white. He pored over geological maps and added a series of earth-toned ribbons showing where he thought the river had flowed in previous decades.

Map via NPR’s Krulwich Wonders as adapted from Harold Fiske’s 1944 Geological Investigation of the Alluvial Valley of the Lower Mississippi River

Click through to see the whole amazing map.

What the Flooding Mississippi Means for America’s Dinner - Food - GOOD

good:

Yes, but could George go meatless for all of June? We are pretty sure he couldn’t. Serenity now! 

good:

Yes, but could George go meatless for all of June? We are pretty sure he couldn’t. Serenity now! 

good:

This might not come as a big surprise to those of us who read the op-ed pages every day, but most commentators are not accurate prognosticators. New analysis of pundits’ statements during the 2008 presidential race shows that while a number of them fared better than a simple coin toss at predicting outcomes, most were reliably inaccurate. Which talking heads got it right occasionally—and which stopped making sense?
See more infographics →
Infographic: How Often Are the Talking Heads Right? - Politics - GOOD

good:

This might not come as a big surprise to those of us who read the op-ed pages every day, but most commentators are not accurate prognosticators. New analysis of pundits’ statements during the 2008 presidential race shows that while a number of them fared better than a simple coin toss at predicting outcomes, most were reliably inaccurate. Which talking heads got it right occasionally—and which stopped making sense?

See more infographics →

Infographic: How Often Are the Talking Heads Right? - Politics - GOOD

good:

Where exactly do Americans align themselves with the question, “Is Islam more likely than other religions to promote violence among its believers?” 
Infographic: How Do Americans Feel About Islam and Violence? - Culture - GOOD

good:

Where exactly do Americans align themselves with the question, “Is Islam more likely than other religions to promote violence among its believers?” 

Infographic: How Do Americans Feel About Islam and Violence? - Culture - GOOD